JLI Most Read Resources of 2017:

  1. Local Humanitarian Leadership & Religious Literacy – Oxfam American and Harvard
  2.  SASA! Faith Guide to prevent violence against women and HIV – Raising Voices, Trocaire
  3.  Developing Guidelines for Faith-sensitive Psychosocial Programs– Lutheran World Federation and Islamic Relief
  4.  Interfaith Toolkit to End Trafficking – UNICEF, Global Partnership to End Violence
  5.  Interreligious Action for Peace- Catholic Relief Services
  6.  UNHCR Shelter and Welcome Campaign#withrefugees

Refugee Hosts Blog call for submissions invites contributions that add to on-going debates about the ‘localisation of aid agenda’, encouraging in particular pieces that help to conceptualise and contextualise ‘the local’ in the context of responses to displacement in the global South:

  • How is ‘the local’ understood and engaged with in responses to conflict-induced displacement? Neighbourhoods? Municipalities? Nations? Geopolitical regions? What is the relationship between these different ‘scales’ of response?
  • How are local responses conceptualised, activated, negotiated or resisted by people affected by displacement?
  • What conceptual, political, policy, pragmatic and ethical challenges and opportunities exist in relation to the ‘localisation agenda’?
  • What are the roles of history and geography in understanding, implementing and/or critiquing the ‘localisation of aid’ agenda?
  • Which local actors are supported and viewed as ‘good partners’, and which local actors are viewed with suspicion? Why, by whom, and with what effect?
  • How are conceptualisations of ‘the local’ framed by assumptions and beliefs about religion and gender (amongst other factors)?
  • What roles can interdisciplinary research methods – from and beyond the Arts and Humanities, the Social and Political Sciences, and Architecture, Planning and Design – play in informing academic, policy and practitioner engagements with local communities.

They invite contributions in the form of short pieces drawing on original research, creative pieces including poems, soundscapes and artwork, photo essays or reflections from the field. In exploring these questions as part of this series, the Refugee Hosts team is keen to explore the ways that interdisciplinary methods can help us better understand the local, both in policy discussions and in academic and public debates.

HOW TO SUBMIT

Submissions must be a maximum of 900 words and written in a way that is accessible to a wide audience. Pieces must reference using hyperlinks only: our online contributions do not use footnotes or other forms of referencing such as Harvard style referencing. Where necessary, a bibliography can also be included containing the list of sources used.

Submissions are welcome on a rolling basis. Please send your submission, along with a short biography of no more than 100 words, to the Refugee Hosts Project and Communications Coordinator Aydan Greatrick on [email protected].

Or for more information see here

Faith-based Engagement of the Global Refugee Crisis

The world is currently experiencing the worst refugee crisis in history.  The United Nations High Commission on Refugees (UNHCR) reports that there are 65 million displaced people globally due to persecution, war, famine or violence. Many face significant health challenges such as psychiatric disorders, infectious diseases and chronic disease in the host-country.  Faith based organizations and churches are recognized as key elements in addressing this global crisis, and many have been advocates of “welcoming the stranger.”(Deut 10:19; Mat 25:34-40)

What is a Christian response to these populations scattered among many nations?  What kinds of unique health concerns do they face?  How can global health workers effectively cross cultures to address needs?  What opportunities exist for respectfully demonstrating and proclaiming the gospel in these settings? What resources can be mobilized?

 

Besides regular general submissions, we call for papers including but not limited to:

  1. Case studies of FBO responses to refugee concerns in areas of conflict or in host countries.
  2. Best practices in improving health outcomes of displaced populations.
  3. Original research on outcomes for health interventions among refugee populations.
  4. Case studies on partnerships with UNHCR or other governmental organizations in serving refugees.
  5. Commentaries on an applied biblical response to the global refugee crisis.
  6. Capacity building for mental health service to build resilience in post-traumatic experiences.
  7. Explorations of the ethics of humanitarian relief and resettlement in context of Christian faith.

Deadline for submissions is 31 March 2018.

 

JLI Leadership Meeting

October 24, 25 London

Salvation Army

The October 25 & 25 meetings of the JLI included 34 board, advisory group and learning hub co-chairs. The two-day meeting objectives were to share the current state of JLI hub evidence, examine JLI’s role considering the external environment and determine JLI’s next steps. Matthew Frost, JLI Board Co-chair for the past few years stepped down at the meeting. Matthew will continue as a general board member. Thanks to Matthew for all the wisdom and gifts shared during your time leading the JLI! With a new board co-chair elected unanimously –Jonathan Duffy, President, ADRA International, JLI will be focusing on how to implement goals identified at the board meeting.

Goals

  1. embed local and national voices into the JLI especially learning hubs
  2. proactive research and ensuring quality
  3. sharpen advocacy and influence

More outcomes from the board meeting to come

Localizing Response to Humanitarian Need: The Role of Religious and Faith-Based Organizations

October 16-19, 2017

Colombo, Sri Lanka

Faith leaders, aid agencies around the world join forum on localizing humanitarian response

JLI cohosted the Localizing Response to Humanitarian Need Forum with over 140 participants representing multiple local and global faith networks, faith-based organizations, aid agencies, policy makers, and government representatives have participated in a forum to strengthen partnership and networks in localizing humanitarian responseFocus on documentation of methods and mechanisms of engagement of local faith networks.

Working Areas:

  • Children & Health
  • Conflict & Peacemaking
  • Disaster response
  • Disaster risk reduction and resilience
  • Refugees & Forced Migration
  • Gender-based Violence

BRIEF SUMMARY REPORT

 

 

The Guidelines on the European Instrument for Democracy and Human Rights (EIDHR) Global call for proposals 2017

deadline 9 Nov 2017
Specific objectives include the following:
  • Lot 1: Supporting Human Rights Defenders in the area of land-related rights, indigenous peoples, in the context of inter alia ‘land grabbing’ and climate change.
  • Lot 2: Fighting against extrajudicial killings and enforced disappearances.
  • Lot 3: Combating forced labour and modern slavery.
  • Lot 4: Promoting and supporting the rights of persons with disabilities.
  • Lot 5: Supporting freedom of religion or belief.

For more information see here

October Events

October 3:  JLI Joint Learning Webinar on Local Humanitarian Leadership with Oxfam America

October 11-12:  WCC Workshop on mapping Christian health services

October 9-13: One Accord Forum and Expo

October 11-13: Alliance for Peacebuilding’s Annual Conference: Peace Now More than Ever

October 14: Boston University Going Viral: Religion and Health

October 16-19Localising Response to Humanitarian Need

October 26: Faith and feminism working group The impact of fundamentalism and extremism on the cultural rights of women: time to take a stand

October 30: UN Strategic Learning Exchange & Skills Building Workshop: Religion, Gender and Youth Inclusion in Peace & Security

October 31: 2017 Annual International Conference on Ethnic and Religious Conflict Resolution and Peacebuilding

 

November

Nov 9: Interfaith Symposium Countering Fear & Rise in Discrimination UK

Nov 10: JLI SGBV Hub Study Dissemination

Nov 12-15: PaRD annual meeting (London)

Nov 15: DFID/ UKAid conference “Current challenges in Freedom of Religion or Belief

Nov 16-18: Vatican: Addressing Global Health Inequalities

Nov 21UN Staff Strategic Learning Exchange- Engaging with Faith Organizations and communities

Nov 26: Faith-based organizations’ contribution to Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction

JLI Joint Learning Opportunity: Webinar on Local Humanitarian Leadership – hosted by the JLI Refugee Hub and Mobilisation of Local Faith Communities Hub

October 3 

Local Humanitarian Leadership and Faith
Guest Presenter: Tara Gingerich – Oxfam America

Moderator: Catriona DejeanTearfund (JLI Mobilisation of Local Faith Communities Learning Hub co-chair)

Local humanitarian leadership is built upon the premise that humanitarian action should be led by local humanitarian actors whenever possible, yet this research finds that secular humanitarian INGOs do not engage systematically with local faith actors in their local leadership work. Based primarily on interviews with humanitarian INGO staff, this research also found that neither secular nor faith-inspired international humanitarian organizations have a sufficient level of religious literacy to enable them to understand the religious dimensions of the contexts in which they work and to effectively navigate their engagement with local faith actors.

Webinar included the following discussion on local humanitarian leadership and religious literacy.

Response from Catriona Dejean
  • Faith-inspired vs faith- embedded organizations – for some FBOs faith is at the DNA of who and how they work, so it is beyond inspiration
  • Role of relationships: trust between local faith communities and secular organizations are critical especially during humanitarian events (ie good examples in Myanmar, Middle East)
  • It is important to not only look at the structures, processes and tools for engaging with faith communties, but also to understand what enables good and open relationships.
  • Attitudes and behaviors on engagement across faiths and non-faith groups could be explored further.
  • What makes a response effective with local faith communities? The report stated no real difference between secular and faith actors. Could it be because we have different definitions of effective? For example some faith organizations and actors are interested in holistic changes so effectiveness may be framed beyond the tangible or traditional definition of effectiveness.
From other attendees:
  • Role of faith-based organizations as intermediaries
  • There seems to be some dissonance between the responses reported in the research (from HQ) and the situation on the ground, where FBOs face a lot of pressure. There might be an openness to the recommendations stemming from the research such as designing a religious literacy toolkit, but there will need to be a true dialogue on a practitioner level and real socialization.
  • Suggestions for secular organizations seeking to discuss topics with faith-based actors for which they have different understandings. How can these conversations happen most productively? Practicality of engaging with local faith actors
    • On alignment (or not) with local faith groups and how to deal with issues – the Oxfam recommendation to develop tools to help truly assess religion/culture/historical influences on the target group in a humanitarian response is vital. That should help tease out more clearly what the actual or perceived differences are. Ultimately though, as was said, if a local faith community (or any partner of any kind) isn’t able to or doesn’t desire to ‘align’ with humanitarian principles – INGOs needs to decide whether the partnership can continue. We have to deal with our issues too of course!
    • If the whole community believes in one specific religion, it’s simple, but if it’s divided into some religious groups, it can become sensitive. The literacy should cover this aspect as well.
  • About LFAs impartiality, neutrality,& proselytising: how often does this happen vs how often do people on the international level worry about this occuring?
  • Forthcoming article called ‘“Faith can come in, but not religion.” Secularity and its effects on the disaster response to Typhoon Haiyan.’ that deals with impartiality and some of the hypocrisy.
  • See Katie Kraft’s article in the ICRC journal on impartiality and proselytization.
  • The basic idea is that religion manifests in Faith-based NGOs in different ways, such as their names, missions, activities, goals, modes of expression, membership or employment criteria, institutional origins, or the identity of populations they serve, and invisibility is their greatest asset. That is, Faith-based NGOs are most effective in private coalitions and when they do not engage in explicitly religious terms.
  • See also American Academy of Religions recent book: Religion, NGOs and the UN
  • Important to dig into ‘instrumentalism’
  • The JLI Refugee hub will be releasing it’s first scoping study on Urban Displacement, Refugees & Forced Migration and the Role of Faith Actors soon.
  • The Mobilisation of Local Faith Communities Hub will have a webinar coming up in December
  • On Oct 16-19, a relevant conference co-hosted by the JLI will occur in Sri Lanka on Localizing the response to Humanitarian Need: The Role of Religious and Faith-based organizations
    see lrf2017.org

Local Humanitarian Leadership and Faith Presentation

 

Keeping Faith in 2030: Religions and the Sustainable Development Goals

Network convenors 
  • Professor Emma Tomalin, Centre for Religion and Public Life, University of Leeds   [email protected]
  • Dr Jörg Haustein, School of Oriental and African Studies, London, [email protected]
  • Shabanna Kidy, Islamic Relief Academy (non-academic project partner)

New Website

First network event: FBO Workshop on Religions and the Sustainable Development Goals

On Monday 13th February 2017, Islamic Relief Academy and the University of Leeds held a workshop in Birmingham, UK. Around 25 participants came together to network and discuss research priorities on religions and the SDGs, representing a mixture of academic and non-governmental organisations, including Islamic Relief, and academic partners from India and Ethiopia.

Questions addressed in the workshop included:

    • Did your organisation have a role in the consultation process to define the SDGs? What were some of the strengths and challenges of the process?
    • To what extent do you feel that religious voices were enabled to be heard in the consultation process and with what effect?
    • To what extent and in what ways are you now beginning to interpret and implement the SDGs in your work?
    • Do you feel the SDGs provide a useful framework to tackle ‘sustainable development’ globally? What are the opportunities and limitations of the SDGs?

Participants discussed the opportunities and challenges presented by Agenda 2030 and discussed current research gaps in the area. As part of the network’s agenda, conferences will be held in these Ethiopia and India over the course of the next eighteen months, with opportunities for country specific consultations to take place. The Network also intends to publish an edited volume and launch a policy paper in the UK Houses of Parliament within the next year and a half.

Notes from Birmingham UK meeting

The next event organised by the network will be held on 24th February 2017 at the University Bath to discuss methodology, religion, and development. More details can be found below.

Methodological Challenges of Researching Religion

Background

Announcing a new religion and sustainable development network – funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Council in the UK – which involves academics and faith-based development actors. The network aims to enhance international exchange about the role of religions in defining, implementing, and safeguarding ‘sustainable development’, as codified in the UN ‘Sustainable Development Goals’ (SDGs).
Religion is a major cultural, social, political, and economic factor in many ODA recipient countries, which is why understanding the local religious dynamics and the role of faith actors is crucial for sustainable development. While development practice and development studies had essentially subscribed to a modernist, secular paradigm of social change for much of the 20th century, this has begun to change. Greater portions of development aid are now channelled via so-called faith-based initiatives or organisations, and religion is increasingly recognised as a human resource rather than just an obstacle to development. Many religious groups have also been involved perceptibly in development policy, by adopting and heralding the Millennium Development Goals and through consultations in the drafting of the new SDGs.
To join their Religions and Development mailing list, sign up here

July 12, 2017

Convened by the Permanent Mission of Ireland to the United Nations and the UN Interagency Task Force on Religion and Development (Chaired by UNFPA) in partnership with the Joint Learning Initiative on Faith and Local Communities.

HE Ambassador David Donoghue, Permanent Mission of Ireland to the United Nations, and Dr Azza Karam, UN Interagency Task Force on Religion and Development will be co-moderating.

Jean Duff will be representing JLI on a panel addressing faith-based partnerships to support achievement of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). The panel will also include JLI Board Member Anwar Khan, Islamic Relief USA.

Click below for more details:

Faith-Based Partnerships: Vehicles for Achieving the SDGs